The Toyota Prius and Toyota Sequoia Are Birds of a Feather

Photo credit: Toyota

Image credit rating: Toyota

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The Toyota Prius is arguably the most effectively-identified hybrid car or truck in the world, and its Prime-badged plug-in hybrid is suitable there with it. Introduced at the start out of the new millennium, the Toyota Prius has helped drive hybrid powertrains to the forefront of American customers. The plug-in Prius Primary joined the Prius nameplate in 2012 and entered its existing generation in 2016. Powering the existing Prius Primary is a 1.8-liter inline-four-cylinder motor that feeds Toyota’s electronically controlled continually variable transmission. Combining the engine with the electrical motor, the Prius Primary throws 121 hp and 105 lb-ft of torque to the front wheels.

Photo credit: Toyota

Picture credit rating: Toyota

Just down from the Prius Primary at your area Toyota supplier is the Toyota Sequoia: a V8-run, overall body-on-frame SUV. The Sequoia released its 2nd-generation energy all the way again in 2007 and hasn’t altered considerably in the last 15 years. When Toyota has declared and shown the following-generation Sequoia, it’s even now waiting around to head into creation. That upcoming-era Sequoia will ditch the 381 hp and 401 hp 5.7-liter V8 and change it with a turbocharged V6. Even now, the second-era Sequoia offers off-road capacity and daring styling, if you can’t wait for its alternative.

On this reward episode of Swift Spin, host Wesley Wren sits down with Autoweek’s Editor Natalie Neff to talk about her time with this not likely pair of Toyotas. They talk about the driving dynamics and activities with the two of these Toyotas and display wherever both of those shine and each falter. The pair also crack down the frequently modifying SUV and compact automobile landscape and the increasing new-car or truck disaster.

Tune in down below, on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever podcasts are played.